Real outsider music.  After Howard Mengler’s first abduction experience he stumbled across an empty building with an alien piano, where he sat down and played music guided by alien hands.

Real outsider music.  After Howard Mengler’s first abduction experience he stumbled across an empty building with an alien piano, where he sat down and played music guided by alien hands.

Drawing Restraint 9 - Matthew Barney + Bjork

Its core idea is the relationship between self-imposed resistance and creativity, a theme it symbolically tracks through the construction and transformation of a vast sculpture of liquid vaseline, called “The Field”, which is molded, poured, bisected and reformed on the deck of the ship over the course of the film. 

Barriers hold form in place, and when they are removed, the film tracks the descent of form into states of sensual surrender and formal atrophy; this shift in the physical state of the sculpture is symbolically mirrored through the narrative of The Guests, two occidental visitors to the ship played in the film by Matthew Barney and Björk, who we first see taken on board, groomed, bathed and dressed in mammal fur costumes based upon traditional Shinto marriage costumes. 

They take part in a tea ceremony in which, in the film’s only moment of spoken dialogue, they are informed about the history of the vessel, and then, as an increasingly powerful lightning storm breaks out overhead, the tatami mat room they occupy floods with liquid vaseline, a fluid which we sense has emanated from The Fieldsculpture itself. 

In a harrowing liebestod which is the climax and centerpiece of the film, the Guests, locked in an embrace and breathing through blowhole-like orifices on the back of their necks, take out flensing knives and cut away each other’s feet and thighs. The remains of their lower body are revealed to contain traces of whale tails at an early stage of development, suggesting rebirth, physical transformation, and the possibility of new forms. 

Having reached a state of maximum disintegration, the sculpture of The Field is then reorganized and the ship emerges from the storm, sailing through a field of icebergs towards the open southern ocean. In the last shot, two whales can be seen swimming behind the ship, headed for Antarctica.

Bertrand Russell’s 10 Commandments of Philosophy

Perhaps the essence of the Liberal outlook could be summed up in a new decalogue, not intended to replace the old one but only to supplement it. The Ten Commandments that, as a teacher, I should wish to promulgate, might be set forth as follows: 


1. Do not feel absolutely certain of anything. 
2. Do not think it worth while to proceed by concealing evidence, for the evidence is sure to come to light.
3. Never try to discourage thinking for you are sure to succeed. 
4. When you meet with opposition, even if it should be from your husband or your children, endeavor to overcome it by argument and not by authority, for a victory dependent upon authority is unreal and illusory. 
5. Have no respect for the authority of others, for there are always contrary authorities to be found. 
6. Do not use power to suppress opinions you think pernicious, for if you do the opinions will suppress you. 
7. Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric. 
8. Find more pleasure in intelligent dissent than in passive agreement, for, if you value intelligence as you should, the former implies a deeper agreement than the latter. 
9. Be scrupulously truthful, even if the truth is inconvenient, for it is more inconvenient when you try to conceal it. 
10. Do not feel envious of the happiness of those who live in a fool’s paradise, for only a fool will think that it is happiness.

Barbara Hammer: Nitrate Kisses

Lesbians and gays were silenced for generations in the 20th century in their stories covered up, their letters and diaries burned, and their history left unrecorded. Homosexuality was illegal, and socially so it was kept hidden. In popular culture, gay and lesbian themes had to be disguised, encoded. Old movies would use scenes of ancient Greece or stories from the bible to present homoerotic images in an acceptable manner. Sapphic love was mired within chaste romance and usually ended with lesbian characters going insane, being murdered or committing suicide. So entire historical chapters about a large part of the population remains blank, empty, nonexistent.

In an attempt to address this gap in the historical record, Hammer constructs an aural record. She includes spoken accounts of the early twentieth century. These oral histories are played back throughout the film along with music – everything from blues to Kurt Weill — from the periods discussed. Cultural evidence of a queer existence. Visually, though, the film takes a totally different path. Hammer uses B&W explicit footage of various same-sex couples (three of women, one of men) having sex. Even though we’re inundated with nudity in contemporary cinema and porn is ubiquitous nowadays, you rarely see couples quite like this. Especially the case of two elderly women — a long-time couple — joyfully making love for the camera. Aside from the sex, there are also lots of clips from period films, music, and lesbian pulp fiction. And every so often it’s topped off with an agit-prop quote plastered across the screen from literary theorists like Michel Foucault.

Nitrate Kisses is vigorously resistant to conventions like narrative, linear storylines, or synchronized sound and picture. Doesn’t matter. It’s not disjointed at all. The film is an engrossing and engaging historical record.—-CIUT-Daniel Garber at the Movies (Toronto)

The Alignment - Jeff Mills, dir Heleen Blanken

The film is about telepathic communication between three sources. It’s about alignment in many forms; arranging the right setting for communication; aligning multiple frequencies and creating the perfect environment for a transfer. So basically, the characters are aligning their frequencies with each other and the third party. 

Refugees of the Septic Heart reflects the heart beat of a nation as it perches on the brink of change. At times philosophical and provocative six dancers search for a society freed of greed, manipulation and control. Gritty physicality and decaying urban sounds evolve into an optimistic undercurrent of mischievous, spirited and irrepressible movement. Inspired by music producer Shackleton’s undulating rhythms, snaking percussions and hypnotic melodies Tom Dale Company unites Barret Hodgson’s digital animation, spoken word by Vengeance Tenfold and Dale’s inventive choreography in a feast of visuals, movement and music.

Refugees of the Septic Heart continues the collaboration between the creative duo (Dale & Hodgson) behind the internationally acclaimed I Infinite.

O B L I Q U E S T R A T E G I E S

(Organic) machinery 
A line has two sides 
A very small object -Its centre 
Abandon desire 
Abandon normal instructions 
Accept advice 
Accretion 
Adding on 
Allow an easement (an easement is the abandonment of a stricture) 
Always first steps 
Always give yourself credit for having more than personality 
Always the first steps 
Are there sections? Consider transitions 
Ask people to work against their better judgement 
Ask your body 
Assemble some of the elements in a group and treat the group 
Back up a few steps. What else could you have done? 
Balance the consistency principle with the inconsistency principle 
Be dirty 
Be extravagant 
Be less critical more often 
Breathe more deeply 
Bridges -build -burn 
Call your mother and ask her what to do. 
Cascades 
Change ambiguities to specifics 
Change instrument roles 
Change nothing and continue with immaculate consistency 
Change specifics to ambiguities 
Children’s voices -speaking -singing 
Cluster analysis 
Consider different fading systems 
Consider transitions 
Consult other sources -promising -unpromising 
Convert a melodic element into a rhythmic element 
Courage! 
Cut a vital connection 
Decorate, decorate 
Define an area as `safe’ and use it as an anchor 
Describe the landscape in which this belongs. (9 August) 
Destroy nothing; Destroy the most important thing 
Discard an axiom 
Disciplined self-indulgence 
Disconnect from desire 
Discover the recipes you are using and abandon them 
Discover your formulas and abandon them 
Display your talent 
Distorting time 
Do nothing for as long as possible 
Do something boring 
Do something sudden, destructive and unpredictable 
Do the last thing first 
Do the washing up 
Do the words need changing? 
Do we need holes? 
Don’t avoid what is easy 
Don’t be afraid of things because they’re easy to do 
Don’t be frightened of cliches 
Don’t be frightened to display your talents 
Don’t break the silence 
Don’t stress one thing more than another 
Emphasize differences 
Emphasize repetitions 
Emphasize the flaws 
Faced with a choice, do both 
Feed the recording back out of the medium 
Feedback recordings into an acoustic situation 
Fill every beat with something 
Find a safe part and use it as an anchor 
First work alone, then work in unusual pairs. 
From nothing to more than nothing 
Get your neck massaged 
Ghost echoes 
Give the game away 
Give way to your worst impulse 
Go outside. Shut the door. 
Go slowly all the way round the outside 
Go to an extreme, move back to a more comfortable place 
How would someone else do it? 
How would you explain this to your parents? 
How would you have done it? 
Humanize something that is free of error. 
Idiot glee (?) 
Imagine the music as a moving chain or caterpillar 
Imagine the music as a series of disconnected events 
In total darkness, or in a very large room, very quietly 
Infinitesimal gradations 
Instead of changing the thing, change the world around it. 
Intentions -credibility of -nobility of -humility of 
Into the impossible 
Is it finished? 
Is something missing? 
Is the intonation correct? 
Is the style right? 
Is the tuning appropriate? 
Is the tuning intonation correct? 
Is there something missing? 
It is quite possible (after all) 
It is simply a matter or work 
Just carry on 
Left channel, right channel, centre channel 
List the qualities it has. List those you’d like. 
Listen in total darkness, or in a very large room, very quietly 
Listen to the quiet voice 
Look at a very small object, look at its centre 
Look at the order in which you do things 
Look closely at the most embarrassing details and amplify. 
Lost in useless territory 
Lowest common denominator check -single beat -single note -single riff 
Magnify the most difficult details 
Make a blank valuable by putting it in an excquisite frame 
Make a sudden, destructive unpredictable action; incorporate 
Make an exhaustive list of everything you might do and do the last thing on the list 
Make it more sensual 
Make what’s perfect more human 
Mechanize something idiosyncratic 
Move towards the unimportant 
Mute and continue 
Not building a wall but making a brick 
Once the search has begun, something will be found 
Only a part, not the whole 
Only one element of each kind 
Overtly resist change 
Pae White’s non-blank graphic metacard 
Pay attention to distractions 
Picture of a man spotlighted 
Put in earplugs 
Question the heroic approach 
Remember those quiet evenings 
Remove a restriction 
Remove ambiguities and convert to specifics 
Remove specifics and convert to ambiguities 
Remove the middle, extend the edges 
Repetition is a form of change 
Retrace your steps 
Revaluation (a warm feeling) 
Reverse 
Short circuit (example; a man eating peas with the idea that they will improve his virility shovels them straight into his lap) 
Shut the door and listen from outside 
Simple subtraction 
Simply a matter of work 
Slow preparation, fast execution 
Spectrum analysis 
State the problem in words as simply as possible 
Steal a solution. 
Take a break 
Take away as much mystery as possible. What is left? 
Take away the elements in order of apparent non-importance 
Take away the important parts 
Tape your mouth 
The inconsistency principle 
The most important thing is the thing most easily forgotten 
The tape is now the music 
Think - inside the work -outside the work 
Think of the radio 
Tidy up 
Towards the insignificant 
Trust in the you of now 
Try faking it 
Turn it upside down 
Twist the spine 
Use “unqualified” people. 
Use an old idea 
Use an unacceptable color 
Use cliches 
Use fewer notes 
Use filters 
Use something nearby as a model 
Use your own ideas 
Voice your suspicions 
Water 
What are the sections sections of? Imagine a caterpillar moving 
What context would look right? 
What do you do? Now, what do you do best? 
What else is this like? 
What is the reality of the situation? 
What is the simplest solution? 
What mistakes did you make last time? 
What most recently impressed you? How is it similar? What can you learn from it? What could you take from it? 
What to increase? What to reduce? What to maintain? 
What were the branch points in the evolution of this entity 
What were you really thinking about just now? Incorporate 
What would make this really successful? 
What would your closest friend do? 
What wouldn’t you do? 
When is it for? Who is it for? 
Where is the edge? 
Which parts can be grouped? 
Who would make this really successful? 
Work at a different speed 
Would anyone want it? 
You are an engineer 
You can only make one dot at a time 
You don’t have to be ashamed of using your own ideas 
Your mistake was a hidden intention 

Pioneers of Electronic Music Festival

Wednesday 6th March
Audiovisual instruments inspired by the life and work of Daphne Oram
In association with Goldsmiths EAVI Research Group.

Daphne Oram created the Oramics machine so she could make her own unique experimental art - a sound unlike anyone else. Each act in this programme presents a new tool for audiovisual performance and interaction, designed to create new sounds and images to reflect their specific character and approach. 

The night is part of Nonclassical’s monthly series, also featuring resident DJs Gabriel Prokofiev, Richard Lannoy, and Nwando. 

Performers include:
Mick Grierson / Chris Kiefer / Tom Richards / Bruno Zamborlin / Ryo Ikeshiro http:/

http://doc.gold.ac.uk/~mus02mg/
www.ryoikeshiro.com/
http://www.tomrichards.info/
http://www.brunozamborlin.com/home

Tickets £5 advance: 

Saturday 9th March

What the Future Sounded Like

St Margaret’s House

6pm


A performance and Q+A with legendary electronic innovator Peter Zinovieff and violinist Aisha Orazbayeva. The pair will be performing some of their recent collaborative work including extracts from OUR, a concerto for violin and computer.
Also featuring a screening of the documentary What The Future Sounded Like, with contributions from Zinovieff among others.
£5 in advance 

Saturday 9th March
Dirty Electronics

St Margaret’s House
1pm - 5pm


Professor and regular Wire contributor John Richards will lead a ‘synth lab’ in which participants learn to build their own synthesiser. This approach to building a synth makes for a truly hands-on, practical experience, allowing anybody to take part.
All participants will be invited to perform at the XOYO Club Night as part of the Dirty Electronics ensemble on 14th March.
£15 / £25 (includes materials and entry to evening event)
To book a place contact nwando@nonclassical.co.uk


Sunday 10th March 
Rio Cinema Double bill: The Day the Earth Stood Still & Forbidden Planet
A special screening of two 1950s science fiction classics whose use of forward thinking electronic music opened up new worlds of sound. 
The Day the Earth Stood Still features one of composer Bernard Herrmann’s most admired scores, featuring the theremin and other electronic instruments.
Forbidden Planet has the first all-electronic musical score devised by Louis and Bebe Barron. 

Tickets: £9.50 (concessions available; includes admission to both screenings)


Tuesday 12th March
'Deconstructing Dad' Raymond Scott biopic

LONDON PREMIERE.
Hackney Picturehouse

A very special evening presenting new documentary ‘Deconstructing Dad’. The film is a personal memoir from Raymond Scott’s son exploring the life and work of his father. Including the groundbreaking Manhattan Research years, in which he created the world’s first electronic music studio and invented what we now know as ambient electronica decades before anyone else.


Nonclassical Djs playing music influenced by raymond scott Introduction from Leon Michener who has reworked RS’s Manhattan research music and will be performing this 2 days later at XOYO club night as part of the festival.

£7 / £5 Concs (on the door) 

 

 

Thursday 14th March

XOYO

 

A club night celebrating the unheard connections that bridge the pioneers of the 1950s to today’s most forward thinking producers:

Raymond Scott’s legendary Manhattan Research Project. Scored and arranged by Leon Michener for an ensemble of rare vintage synthesisers.

Messiaen | Oraison (1937). Performed by Ondes Martenot and 5 mono synths
Stockhausen | Kontakte (1958, version for percussion, piano & electronics).
Varese | Poeme Electronique (1958) (with original film by Le Corbusier).

Dirty Electronics: A 30-piece all electronic ensemble led by John Richards, performing works inspired by Andrew Bentley, Hugh Davis and Richard Orton.

Plus new arrangements and versions of music by Delia Derbyshire, Daphne Oram, and Tristram Cary.

*** Headline DJ set: ALEX PATERSON (THE ORB) ***
A very special set traversing the history of cutting edge electronic music, from one of modern dance music’s pioneers.

Performers include:
George Barton / Siwan Mair Rhys / Matthew Schellhorn / Augustin Viard / Leon Michener (+ guests) / Sam Mackay / John Richards (+30 piece synth ensemble) Plus Nonclassical Resident DJs Gabriel Prokofiev and Nwando

Sunday 17th March

Filmphonics 
Hackney Picturehouse, 270 Mare Street E8 1HE

A selection of films exploring the lives and works of some of the great figures of electronic music, including:

Practical Electronica (Ian Helliwell, 2011), a boldly experimental film surveying the innovative tape-based work of British pioneer FC Judd.
The Same Trade as Mozart (BBC, 1969), an earlier look at electronic music with contributions from Stockhausen, Daphne Oram, Tristram Cary and others
The Delian Mode (Kara Blake, 2009), award winning short documentary on the iconic British sound pioneer Delia Derbyshire.

Talks and performances from Simon Emmerson, Ian Helliwell and Mick Grierson
Nonclassical DJs Richard Lannoy and Nwando

£7 / £5 Concs

 

At the dances I was one of the most untiring and gayest. One evening a cousin of Sasha, a young boy, took me aside. With a grave face, as if he were about to announce the death of a dear comrade, he whispered to me that it did not behoove an agitator to dance. Certainly not with such reckless abandon, anyway. It was undignified for one who was on the way to become a force in the anarchist movement. My frivolity would only hurt the Cause.I grew furious at the impudent interference of the boy. I told him to mind his own business. I was tired of having the Cause constantly thrown into my face. I did not believe that a Cause which stood for a beautiful ideal, for anarchism, for release and freedom from convention and prejudice, should demand the denial of life and joy. I insisted that our Cause could not expect me to become a nun and that the movement would not be turned into a cloister. If it meant that, I did not want it. “I want freedom, the right to self-expression, everybody’s right to beautiful, radiant things.” Anarchism meant that to me, and I would live it in spite of the whole world — prisons, persecution, everything. Yes, even in spite of the condemnation of my own closest comrades I would live my beautiful ideal. 
 
Emma Goldman / Living My Life / 1931 / p56

At the dances I was one of the most untiring and gayest. One evening a cousin of Sasha, a young boy, took me aside. With a grave face, as if he were about to announce the death of a dear comrade, he whispered to me that it did not behoove an agitator to dance. Certainly not with such reckless abandon, anyway. It was undignified for one who was on the way to become a force in the anarchist movement. My frivolity would only hurt the Cause.
I grew furious at the impudent interference of the boy. I told him to mind his own business. I was tired of having the Cause constantly thrown into my face. I did not believe that a Cause which stood for a beautiful ideal, for anarchism, for release and freedom from convention and prejudice, should demand the denial of life and joy. I insisted that our Cause could not expect me to become a nun and that the movement would not be turned into a cloister. If it meant that, I did not want it. “I want freedom, the right to self-expression, everybody’s right to beautiful, radiant things.” Anarchism meant that to me, and I would live it in spite of the whole world — prisons, persecution, everything. Yes, even in spite of the condemnation of my own closest comrades I would live my beautiful ideal.

 

Emma Goldman / Living My Life / 1931 / p56

Sighthill Stone Circle

Designed and erected by astronomer Duncan Lunan in 1979 - therefore it’s the first astronomically aligned circle to be built in the UK for more than 3000 years.

 The stones stand as a connection between Glasgow’s ancient past and the modern 21st century city it is today.

Luminarie De Cagna

55,000 LEDs
28 meters high

http://vimeo.com/35914033

(was on display at the 2012 Light Festival in Ghent, Belgium)

Kuedo @ C2C Festival Showcase

I’ll confess to not knowing much about Kuedo, I had his Fact Mix on rotation late last year but for some reason that didn’t encourage me to explore his own productions (I can be foolish like that). Only recently did it click that a tune I’d put on a YouTube playlist called Star Fox was Kuedo AKA Jamie Vex’d. In 2004 Vex’d were big for me, I loved the urgency and aggression of their productions - more rooted in jungle (at that point a genre I completely misunderstood) than the other dubstep I was exploring.

8 years later, you can still hear the origins of the Vex’d sound but Jamie has taken it in a direction I could never have imagined. His set starts with bass driven lullabies for space travellers children and builds slowly into epic soundscapes made dynamic with hectic bass and synth patterns. He utilises a relatively limited palette of sounds, punctuated with the recurring percussion of a tight closed cymbal. There is an ethereal, siren like quality to Kuedo’s melodies, which if you allow will wash over you creating a textured landscape where it becomes possible to lose yourself and explore deep space. Rather than defining your experience, this allows you to find your own rhythm and dance pattern. Towards the end of the set, lift off occurs and the dark menacing roots of Vex’d pound heavy bass.

AV Festival (biennial international Festival of contemporary art, music and film) is thematically curated to engage audiences with current ideas across art, society and technology. This year their programme revolves around the run-up to London 2012 with its motto of “Faster, Higher, Stronger” AV propose an alternative slower pace and relaxed rhythm to counter the accelerated speed of today. Titled after ASLSP (As SLow aS Possible), by pioneering artist John Cage, the theme explores how artists have stretched, measured and marked the passage of time. Some works last the full 31 days others are infinite in duration or move imperceptibly slowly: 14 seconds become 31 minutes, an hour becomes 24, and we can all dream in a 12-hour sleep concert.
Everything across the 5th edition of AV looks fascinating, but the event I’m most excited about is Hamish Fulton’s Slow Walk, 31st March, Newcastle Quayside.  Since the 1960s, Fulton has produced images and text pieces responding to his physical engagement with rural and urban landscapes. In 1973, he resolved to only make art resulting from individual walks. Devising group walks from the early 1990s onwards, he has completed over 30 across the world, including Japan, Norway and the USA.
Fulton’s slow walks are mass participation events, bringing hundreds of people together to walk very slowly in silence as a meditative experience. For AV Festival, the artist leads a group walk on a landmark post-industrial site near the River Tyne. Participants are both the art and the audience.
I’m going – there are still places left – book via the website

AV Festival (biennial international Festival of contemporary art, music and film) is thematically curated to engage audiences with current ideas across art, society and technology. This year their programme revolves around the run-up to London 2012 with its motto of “Faster, Higher, Stronger” AV propose an alternative slower pace and relaxed rhythm to counter the accelerated speed of today. Titled after ASLSP (As SLow aS Possible), by pioneering artist John Cage, the theme explores how artists have stretched, measured and marked the passage of time. Some works last the full 31 days others are infinite in duration or move imperceptibly slowly: 14 seconds become 31 minutes, an hour becomes 24, and we can all dream in a 12-hour sleep concert.

Everything across the 5th edition of AV looks fascinating, but the event I’m most excited about is Hamish Fulton’s Slow Walk, 31st March, Newcastle Quayside.  Since the 1960s, Fulton has produced images and text pieces responding to his physical engagement with rural and urban landscapes. In 1973, he resolved to only make art resulting from individual walks. Devising group walks from the early 1990s onwards, he has completed over 30 across the world, including Japan, Norway and the USA.

Fulton’s slow walks are mass participation events, bringing hundreds of people together to walk very slowly in silence as a meditative experience. For AV Festival, the artist leads a group walk on a landmark post-industrial site near the River Tyne. Participants are both the art and the audience.

I’m going – there are still places left – book via the website

From the Scottish Film and Television Archive - a public film made in 1971 covering Glasgow’s redevelopment - directed by Oscar Marzaroli.

Berndnaut Smilde is fascinated by anything in between.
I’m fascinated by the concept -the works at Probe are only available to view online, at some point they were real (during their creation) but the viewer will never experience them physically - so how does it affect their perception?  
With Nimbus the recontextualisation of clouds in an indoor space (that they could never naturally occur in) allows Smilde to control the finished product.  However this doesn’t feel like ‘just’ a photograph of a cloud - maybe that’s because of the multi perspective documentation of the work.

Berndnaut Smilde is fascinated by anything in between.

I’m fascinated by the concept -the works at Probe are only available to view online, at some point they were real (during their creation) but the viewer will never experience them physically - so how does it affect their perception?  

With Nimbus the recontextualisation of clouds in an indoor space (that they could never naturally occur in) allows Smilde to control the finished product.  However this doesn’t feel like ‘just’ a photograph of a cloud - maybe that’s because of the multi perspective documentation of the work.

____/Outwith: chiefly Scottish, meaning beyond, outside of____/Agency: the capacity of an agent (a person or other entity) to act in a world

twitter.com/outwithagency

view archive



VISION

CONTACT